Motion to Terminate Probation Early Granted

Recently, Attorneys at The Umansky Law Firm had a case where the client was on probation for trafficking of hydrocodone. None of the attorneys at The Umansky Law Firm represented her on the underlying offense, where she was at some point sentenced to probation. Once she completed half of a term of probation, she contacted The Umansky Law Firm and inquired whether or not an attorney would be helpful in getting her off of probation. Once retained, our attorney filed the motion to early terminate her probation. In that motion, the judge was told everything that this particular client had been doing since she was on probation, such as holding a job, going to school, and all the conditions she had completed.

Our attorney put all of that in the motion and submitted it to the judge. In most of these cases, the judge wants to know what the state’s position on this motion is. In this particular case, the State objected to the motion being granted and basically decided that this particular client had gotten a very fair sentence at the time she pled. However, the judge took the motion and granted it. This judge approved the motion in chambers, so the client didn’t even have to go and face a court room again. This motion can normally be found at the halfway point of your probation, and when all of the conditions are complete.

Attorneys at The Umansky Law Firm normally fill out a motion where all of the good things the client has been doing while on probation are indicated, including whether you are working or currently going to school. Also included are any hardships that probation has caused, including an outline for the judge stating exactly what conditions the individual has completed while on probation. It is easiest for some lawyers if the individual saves all documentation for probation so when it is time to file this motion, the lawyer can attach all certificates, receipts, and everything else the individual has done on probation to the motion. The more information put in this motion, the better chance it has of being granted. Sometimes, these motions can even get granted in chambers, which would help avoiding court.