Florida Constitutional Amendments that You Can Vote on in 2020

On November 3, Florida voters have a chance to dramatically change state laws. While there aren’t as many issues on the ballot as there were in 2018, there are still six constitutional amendments that Florida residents will vote on in November. The amendments on the ballot involve raising the minimum wage, changing the way elections are run, and providing a tax break to the spouses of veterans. Here’s a look at the six amendments that Florida residents can vote on in November. 

Requiring Citizenship to Vote in Any Florida Election

This amendment would change the wording of Florida’s state constitution from saying that “every citizen” can vote to “only a citizen” of the United States can vote. Policymakers have suggested the change in wording to prevent cities from allowing non-citizens to vote. 

Raising Florida’s Minimum Wage

The second amendment on the ballot in November would raise Florida’s minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2026.  While Florida’s current minimum wage is greater than the federal minimum— $7.25 per hour—it still only guarantees workers a minimum of $8.56 per hour. Many progressive activists are calling for a change to the minimum wage, highlighting the increasing wealth gap between hourly workers and corporate executives. Opponents of the amendment say the new wage mandate would put too much stress on small businesses.

Allowing All Voters to Vote in Primary Elections 

Currently, Florida only allows registered voters within a certain party to vote in their party’s primary elections, which determines which candidate will move forward to the general election. However, a new amendment on the ballot in November would allow all registered voters—regardless of their registered party—to vote in the primaries for governor, state legislature, and cabinet elections. This could result in multiple Democrats or Republicans moving forward to the general election. 

Making It Harder to Change Florida’s State Constitution

Florida’s state constitution has seen a lot of changes, and some residents would like to see it change less. A new amendment on the ballot in November would make it harder to change the foundation of Florida’s state laws. Instead of holding one vote and requiring the approval of 60 percent of voters, the new amendment would require 60 percent approval in two separate votes. 

Extending the Tax Benefit on Homesteaded Properties 

In Florida, if you own a homesteaded property, you are eligible for certain tax exemptions. Florida’s “Save Our Homes” law limits the percent increase on homesteaded property values to 3 percent each year. Additionally, when a homestead property owner sells their home, the law allows them to only pay taxes total to the home’s value minus the value of any claimed tax exemptions. One of the new amendments on the ballot in November seeks to address a loophole in the “Save Our Homes” law by providing Florida residents with an extra year to claim their tax benefit on homesteaded properties. 

Implementing a Tax Discount for Spouses of Deceased Veterans Who Suffered from Combat-Related Disabilities 

Most Florida veterans who were honorably discharged or permanently disabled by combat-related injuries receive a discount on their property taxes. A new amendment on the ballot in November would allow the spouses of deceased veterans to continue to claim this tax exemption after a veteran’s passing. 

Contact a Skilled Criminal Defense Lawyer in Central Florida

If you are a Florida resident who is facing criminal charges or has had their rights violated, it is important to seek legal counsel. At The Umansky Law Firm, our team has helped countless clients facing criminal charges throughout Central Florida. Our personalized approach guarantees your case will receive the attention it deserves.  We have dedicated our law practice to representing people who are in a fight for their life—usually against a much larger adversary. Our dedication to success coupled with our effective communication allows us to build strong relationships with our clients. 

With more than 100 years of combined legal experience, our team has the skills and expertise to fight for your rights. To schedule a free consultation, call (407) 228-3838 or complete an online contact form.