Failure to Report a Conviction or Plea for Building Inspectors

Failure to Report a Conviction or Plea for Building InspectorsA building inspector is a government employee in charge of reviewing plans and visiting construction sites to confirm that all local and national building codes and regulations are being met. The building inspector, for example, will look at the wiring, HVAC system, foundation, roof, siding, garage, plumbing, and any electrical equipment to ensure that the project meets the standards set by the state. To become a licensed home inspector in the State of Florida, candidates must take a 120-credit hour pre-licensing course and a state-approved exam.

In Florida, a criminal violation can often result in harsher consequences for a licensed professional than someone who doesn’t hold a specialized license or certification. For building inspectors who have their licenses, there are stringent reporting requirements for those charged with a crime, whether they receive a guilty conviction or enter a plea. Failing to do so could result in additional penalties beyond the statutory consequences handed down by the state.

Who Licenses Building Inspectors in Florida?

The State of Florida requires building inspectors to be licensed by the Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR). The Florida Building Code Administrators and Inspectors Board under the DBPR is responsible for administering exams, reviewing complaints, and issuing licenses to Florida building inspectors.

If a Florida building inspector fails to report their conviction or plea deal to the DBPR—even if it has nothing to do with the nature of the job or the defendant is ultimately not guilty of the crime—they could potentially face penalties that include a letter of reprimand, fines, probation, suspension, or revocation. This notification must be within 30 days of the event.

Repercussions for Failing to Report a Conviction or Plea Deal to the DBPR

No matter the crime you’re accused of, you should understand the professional ramifications and the criminal sanctions you could face. Ultimately, if you’re charged with a crime or enter a plea, the Department of Business and Professional Regulation could find probable cause to warrant sanctions against your Florida Building Inspector Certificate. Even if you’re not charged with a crime, breaking the terms of your contract can instigate a disciplinary hearing.

Florida Statute 456.072 notes that anyone who is licensed in the State of Florida can be disciplined for not reporting their crime to the board within 30 days, including licensed building inspectors:

“Failing to report to the board, or the department if there is no board, in writing within 30 days after the licensee has been convicted or found guilty of, or entered a plea of nolo contendere to, regardless of adjudication, a crime in any jurisdiction. Convictions, findings, adjudications, and pleas entered into prior to the enactment of this paragraph must be reported in writing to the board.”

The penalties you may face if you fail to report your conviction or plea deal—or if you’re found to be in violation of your Florida building inspector contract—include the following:

  • A letter of reprimand
  • Fines
  • Probation
  • License suspension
  • License revocation

Complaints against building inspectors can put their license and livelihood at risk. If you think you may lose your license as a result of a criminal conviction or plea, don’t delay in seeking trusted legal defense.

Grounds for a Florida Building Inspector to Face Disciplinary Action

A Florida building inspector may not only face penalties related to their job; they may also encounter additional penalties for conduct outside of the job that violates the Florida Statutes, such as drug usage. Violations include:

  • Unsafe building structures
  • Maintenance issue violations
  • Working without a valid license
  • Misallocation of funds
  • Project abandonment
  • Neglect to obtain proper permits
  • Negligent inspection
  • Negligence resulting in injury or significant property damage

Fortunately, with an expert Orlando criminal defense lawyer by your side, you may be able to eliminate the penalties associated with the crime and save your license.

Contact a Skilled Florida Professional License Defense Lawyer

If you’re a licensed building inspector who has been arrested and faces penalties for failing to report the crime to the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation, don’t hesitate to seek professional legal assistance. For help protecting your education, professional career, and rights, look no further than the highly knowledgeable criminal and professional license defense lawyers at The Umansky Law Firm.

With over 100 years of combined legal experience, our team has the resources and expertise to investigate your case and fight for an outcome that’s in your best interest. We understand the ins and outs of Florida administrative laws and stand committed to protecting you from further penalty and harm to your reputation. Call (407) 890-0336 or complete our contact form to schedule a free consultation.