Comparing The Conditions of Probation In Florida

In simple terms, probation is supervision of a particular defendant or accused by the county or state to ensure he remains law-abiding and fulfills certain requirements. After entering a plea, a defendant may be sentenced to probation in lieu of jail or prison time. Although the defendant avoids time behind bars, he must abide by a strict set of rules or face being sent to jail or prison should he violate the probation terms. For this reason, probation is both a gift and a curse.

If you have been sentenced to probation following criminal charges, you should know that you must follow all the rules closely and complete all requirements carefully. No matter what type of probation you’ve been placed on, you must make sure to follow the terms set forth by the judge to the tee. If you are sentenced to probation, you may be required to pay court fines, participate in specific classes or attend counseling, complete community service, and more. Certain requirements will be specific to your case. In general, all defendants sentenced to probation must:

  • Avoid being arrested a subsequent time
  • Avoid drinking alcohol to an excess, or drinking at all if the defendant is on probation for a DUI
  • Avoid using illegal drugs or substances
  • Avoid cohabiting with others who commit criminal offenses
  • Keep in touch with probation officers at least monthly
  • Maintain employment. A defendant who is not employed will be required to look for employment. Proof of employment must be shown to your probation officer or you will be required to explain why you have not found employment.
  • Not own or possess any firearms

Specific Conditions of Probation

It is important to closely abide by standard and specific probation conditions because the consequences for probation violations could lead to incarceration. Violating even one term of probation can lead to you ending up in jail facing the sentence you could have received had you not been placed on probation, or an even longer sentence. A judge may add or remove certain probation conditions that are specific to your case. Specific conditions might include requiring you to:

  • Complete a DUI class
  • Complete an anger management seminar
  • Perform community service
  • Pay a fine
  • Fulfill court calls
  • Attend counseling
  • Complete a life care plan
  • Obtain a driver’s license or high school diploma

For more information about probation terms and the consequences of violating probation, speak with a criminal defense attorney. It may be possible to avoid further penalties with a strong defense lawyer advocating for your interests. Call The Umansky Law Firm at 407-228-3838 or contact us online to discuss your case for free.