Revocation of Your Bond

trial attorney orlandoThis article was first published on June 4, 2012. Some of the laws may have changed since that date. George Zimmerman turned himself into jail again in Sanford, Florida as prosecutors alleged that he misled the court about his finances at his first bond hearing. As a result, his bond was set to one million dollars and required a sort of “fundraising” to get him out of jail.

Whether the allegations against Zimmerman were true or not, the moral of the story is to never lie to the judge or present perjured testimony on your behalf in an effort to get your bail or bond reduced. When you lie to a judge and jury about your income, the judge has the right to increase your bond or revoke your bail altogether. Other instances that may result in the revocation of your bond include:

  • Committing a crime while released 
  • Violating a condition of bail

There are numerous situations where family and friends may not be able to raise enough money to post bond, and the individual will have to wait an extended period until the court date. A bondsman can step into this situation and post the bond, but it will essentially work much like a loan that will be paid back with interest or a set fee.

Dangers of Providing Misleading Statements in Court

At an initial bond hearing, the defendant alone or through witnesses may present testimony that his or her financial resources are limited in an effort to convince the judge to set a low bond. Just remember that the state might independently investigate the veracity of your testimony and you do not want to be put in a position where the state, your lawyer or the judge suspects you of not being one hundred percent truthful.

In cases when the state finds out the defendant or their witnesses may have lied, the government will move to revoke the bond set and potentially prosecute the perpetrator with perjury. Prison time and fines are legitimate penalties for being found guilty of perjury, but ultimately it’s at the discretion of the judge. Individuals who work in career fields where trustworthiness is valued (legal profession, public service, and law enforcement) may lose their professional license as a result of a conviction.

Ways to Get Around Revocation of Your Bond

There are numerous situations where family and friends may not be able to raise enough money to post bond, and the individual must wait an extended period until the court date. A bondsman can step into this situation and post the bond, but it essentially works much like a loan that is paid back with interest or provided for a set fee.

Once the bondsman puts the required deposit with the court, you are free to await trial outside of jail. You must pay a non-refundable fee to the bailsman and you must show up to court so that the court can return your deposit at a later date. If you do not appear in court, the court keeps the money paid on your behalf, and the bondsman goes to find you and/or any cosigners in order to get the money back.

How an Orlando Bond Hearing Lawyer Can Help

Having a bond set will grant you freedom for the time being, allowing you to spend time with friends and family while you await your arraignment. It’s important to be able to organize your life outside of jail while you can instead of waiting for a court or trial date behind bars. When things occur that cause a court to revoke your bond, your life, family, and finances might go into a tailspin and you need an experienced defense attorney to step in and help.

If you or a loved one experience a bond revocation and are in need of a hearing, contact the bond lawyers at The Umansky Law Firm. We understand that staying behind bars as you await your trial does you and your family no good. As members of the Florida Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and former state prosecutors with more than 100 years of combined case experience, we can help you get back home to the people you love. Contact us today at 407-228-3838 to speak with an experienced attorney.