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Orlando, Florida Criminal Defense Blog

Educator arrested on child pornography allegations in Orlando

  • 23
  • July
    2014

A criminal charge is the result of an investigation into any wrongdoing or illegal activity. Here in Central Florida, readers know that local authorities are always investigating reports of possible illegal activities in order to keep local residents safe. Each criminal charge may fall into different categories such as misdemeanor, felony or a federal offense. Each charge is unique and can lead to different punishments if the accused person is convicted.

In Orlando, Florida, a 42-year-old elementary school teacher was taken into custody on child pornography charges. Based on a report, an undercover FBI agent received six videos and 141 pictures showing juvenile sexual abuse from the accused. Authorities then issued a search warrant and found thousands of child pornographic images on the teacher's computer. Authorities also discovered an image that depicted a young boy who was being sexually abused by the teacher. The teacher was charged with receipt, distribution, production and possession of child pornography.

Traveling to Meet a Child Bust

  • 21
  • July
    2014

Operation Cyber Child III concluded on Monday, June 30th, and yielded some considerable results for the Polk County Sheriff's Office. 16 men were arrested as a result of the undercover operation focusing on adults travelling to meet minors to engage in sexual activity as well as adults who possess child pornography.

Sex crime investigation leads to arrest of 16 in Orlando

  • 18
  • July
    2014

Lewd conduct or any form of malicious intent toward another person is not tolerated in the state of Florida. Here in Central Florida, law enforcement officers often conduct investigations and entrapment operations to prevent sex crimes, such as rape, prostitution and possession of child pornography. Authorities also aim to protect children from sexual predators who are soliciting sex on the Internet.

In Orlando, Florida, police apprehended 16 people, including employees from Universal Orlando and Walt Disney World, for allegedly travelling to meet underage boys and girls to engage in sexual activity. Based on a report, the defendants allegedly used the Internet to lure the children. Some of the accused faced possession of child pornography charges while others were charged with wanting to have sex with underage children. Police officers said they will continue to conduct numerous investigations to protect children from sexual predators. Authorities are also targeting individuals who may be involved in the production or distribution of child pornography.

Former YMCA employee arrested on grand theft charge

  • 10
  • July
    2014

Theft - taking someone else's money or property - is often a betrayal of personal trust. As is the case with many state laws, Florida law distinguishes theft as petty or grand based on the amount involved and the way it was taken. Both types of theft charges come with their own unique penalties that are imposed when a person is convicted of the charge. Beyond the criminal penalties, however, social stigma is often attached to someone who has betrayed the trust of others.

A 49-year-old Ocala woman could soon be experiencing this after her recent arrest for grand theft. According to the Ocala Police Department, the woman allegedly stole over $10,000 in course of performing her job as a membership consultant and office staffer at the local YMCA. When YMCA directors discovered the theft, they fired the woman and contacted police.

Woman faces charges including attempted murder

  • 03
  • July
    2014

Criminal charges often result if a person commits an illegal act in the state or in the country. In Orlando, Florida, residents understand that each criminal offense carries a unique set of penalties, which may include jail time, fines, probation and other negative consequences. Some charges fall into the misdemeanor category, while others are felonies. A criminal offense can be prosecuted in either a state or federal court, depending on the severity and nature of the offense. A person accused of a crime will need to present a strong defense to avoid the serious repercussions of a conviction.

Recently, one woman was arrested for hit-and-run, child neglect and attempted murder in Orlando, Florida. Based on a report, the accused woman was driving a sports utility vehicle when she crashed into a fence after she swerved her vehicle and attempted to hit the father of her children. The driver then fled the scene of the crash. According to authorities, after searching for the SUV, they found the accused woman fighting with another woman. Police also discovered the woman's three children inside the vehicle, aged two months, one year and three years. Additionally, her three children were not wearing their safety harnesses.

Be Safe and Avoid a Fourth of July DUI Arrest

  • 01
  • July
    2014

Thumbnail image for images.jpgAs many of you already know, this Friday marks the 238th anniversary of the independence of the United States of America. A true American holiday, the 4th of July is often a day filled with partying and patriotism. Hot dogs, burgers, and of course alcohol will be flowing (perhaps even more so with the holiday falling on a Friday this year). Some will spend the entire week planning out their 4th of July festivities; but many will fail to plan for arguably the most crucial part of this holiday, getting home. We want you to be safe this holiday weekend and avoid any chance of a DUI arrest.

Police arrest man for cocaine and other drug charges

  • 27
  • June
    2014

In Orlando, Florida, law enforcement officials painstakingly follow all leads that can lead to the apprehension of people involved in drug crimes. And once a person has been apprehended for drug crimes, the accused is likely to face severe penalties, depending on the charges. For example, a person caught with a specific amount of drug may be charged with misdemeanor possession, while a person who was caught carrying a large quantity may face a more serious charge such as drug distribution or trafficking.

Such is the case of a central Florida man who was arrested in Deltona on drug charges after police discovered marijuana and cocaine concealed under his stomach fat. Based on a report, authorities ordered the driver to pull over after they saw the accused riding without a safety harness. The 42-year-old man whose estimated weight was 450 pounds, stated that his size prevented him from wearing the seatbelt. Police also noticed that the driver of the car was nervous during their conversation and requested a drug-detecting dog to check the vehicle. Authorities discovered 23 grams of suspected marijuana and cocaine in the driver's possession. They also found $7,000 in cash and a handgun.

Search and Seizure and our Cell Phones! Privacy at Last

  • 25
  • June
    2014

Can the police search and seize our cell phones without a warrant after an arrest?

In an age where ninety percent of Americans own a cell phone, the United States Supreme Court has taken steps towards granting Americans the privacy that many of them want and feel that they deserve when it comes to the content on their cell phones.  The Supreme Court heard arguments in April on two cases that addressed the issue of whether or not police officers need a warrant to search the cell phones of the individuals whom they arrest.

          The first case, Riley v. California, arose when David Riley was pulled over in San Diego for having an expired auto registration.  The police found loaded guns in his car, and, upon an inspection of Mr. Riley's smart phone, entries they associated with a street gang.  A more comprehensive search of Mr. Riley's phone found led to information that linked him to a shooting.

          The second case, U.S. v. Wurie involved the search of the call log of Mr. Brima Wurie's flip phone after he was arrested in 2007 in Boston and charged with gun and drug crimes.  This case made it to the Supreme Court after the federal appeals court in Boston threw out the evidence found on Mr. Wurie's phone.

          The Justice Department, arguing on behalf of the United States and their police force, claimed that cell phones are not materially different from wallets, purses and address books.  Chief Justice John Roberts and the rest of the Supreme Court disagreed.  In an unanimous 9-0 opinion, the United States Supreme Court ruled that the police do need warrants to search the cell phones of the people that they arrest.  Chief Justice Roberts went as far to say that "modern cell phones are now such a pervasive and insistent part of daily life that a visitor from Mars might conclude they were an important feature of human anatomy."

          Although this ruling will be considered a win by proponents of applying the Fourth Amendment (which bars unreasonable searches) to the content of cell phones, it is a huge blow to law enforcement agencies that would prefer more latitude to search without having to obtain a warrant (Chicago Tribune).  The Chief Justice admitted that there is no denying that their ruling will have an impact on the ability of law enforcement to combat crime; however, the right to privacy comes at a cost.  What cost are you willing to pay?

 

 

Florida man crashes with police car, arrested for DUI

  • 20
  • June
    2014

Federal and state governments prohibit drunk driving in all 50 states in order to save lives. It is a way to prevent a driver from causing an alcohol-related accident and injuring or killing others. Preventing drunk driving may also save someone from a DUI arrest. Unfortunately, a Florida man learned these lessons the hard way after he crashed his car into a police cruiser.

An 83-year-old man living in Palm Coast, north of Orlando, Florida, was arrested on drunk driving charges and leaving the scene of a crash. Reportedly, the man was driving the wrong way on State Road 100 when his vehicle collided with a deputy's vehicle. The accident injured the officer and damaged his vehicle. Police who later located the suspect after he allegedly fled the crash scene claimed that they smelled an odor of alcohol from his vehicle and noticed that the man was slow to respond to their questions.

Man in jail faces a new grand theft charge

  • 12
  • June
    2014

Taking someone else's property is against the law. In Orlando, Florida, and anywhere else in the nation, theft charges can be considered a misdemeanor or a felony, depending on the value of the stolen object. Theft charges may stem from various illegal activities including burglary or entering a private premise, robbery or taking someone else's property using force and armed robbery or committing a robbery while using weapons. Each charge comes with a unique set of penalties that can lead to a prison sentence and fines upon conviction.

A man who is currently incarcerated for theft charges in Polk County, Florida, was recently charged with grand theft in another county - St. Lucie. Based on a report, the defendant allegedly bought two cars with bad checks. Additionally, the defendant is accused of trading one of the illegally obtained cars to finance another vehicle. The defendant will be extradited to St. Luce County once his charges are settled in Polk County.

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